The Top 3 Social Media and Online Sites Students are Using Right Now

The Top 3 Social Media and Online Sites Students are Using Right Now

The online and social media landscape is constantly changing, and middle school and high school students are often the first to use new social media sites and other digital products. As a campus security and public safety professional, you need to know what the students in your schools are viewing on the internet so that you can protect them. But keeping up with the latest trends can be extremely challenging.

So what are the three hottest social media and online products that ‘tweens and teens are currently using? To find out, CS interviewed Sam Jingfors, who is vice president of Safer Schools Together. In this video, he tells us about Snapchat, Instagram and the game Fortnite, as well as some of the risks associated with each.

Sam Jingfors: Snapchat came out in 2011, until this day in 2018, it is the most popular App that they’re using to communicate one to one with each other. And of course their claim to fame was that the Snapchat photos disappear in 10 seconds or less. Poof, they’re gone. We know that they don’t really disappear, because we see screenshots of them on other platforms.

But I think some of the changes over the past year specifically that have changed the game in terms of school safety, but also how our kids are using it, is public Snapchat story, and the fact that each one of our schools has a searchable public Snapchat story that our kids are adding photos and videos to.

Secondly is SnapMap, which allows kids to be able to geo-locate their friends and specifically their bit emojis, which is their small, animated caricature, a representation of who their friends are. They can see where they are on a map in real time, down the square block. So that certainly pulls some challenges too, in the eyes of parents, wanting to make sure that their kids are safe online.

So we’re always making sure that our kids are aware of every single one of their Snapchat contacts for example.

Want to learn how to identify precursors to violence that are leaked through social media posts? Attend this summer’s Campus Safety Conferences, which are being held in Texas, Virginia and California. In all three events, Sam Jingfors of Safer Schools Together will present Digital Threat Assessment: How Publically Available Social Media Can be Utilized and Assessed to Ensure Safe Campuses. To register, visit CampusSafetyConference.com.
The second most popular App is Instagram. Owned by Facebook, Facebook of course is going through some privacy challenges at the moment, and that’s had an impact certainly on the way that Instagram operates. But privacy as it relates to Instagram for our kids, it’s either you’re public or you’re private. It’s like a light switch in the setting.

So we recommend to parents to make sure if they’re young kids especially, are getting into the social media world, they’re likely asking for Instagram, make sure that account is private right off the bat, which allows you to control the followers, and those that actually want to follow you. And you can approve and deny at a willing basis.

Third most popular, just to keep it succinct, is a game called Fortnite. It’s part of the Battle Royale type category of games, which is kind of a free for all. It is taking over the world. Every student I know at school right now is either playing Fortnite or is annoyed that other people are talking about Fortnite and playing it. All the way from grade four or five, all the way up to college age students. It started off just being a computer game, and then they just recently released both their Android as well as iPhone edition of the game.

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So there isn’t a ton of risk associated with contact with strangers aside from just the game play, and relatively it is one of the more creative that has been released over the last little while.

So certainly I think part of the point with parents in Fortnite is just regulating screen time with that, just trying to moderate that. And putting limits in place that they’re not playing 13 hours a day of Fortnite and ignoring other areas of their life.

So I’m really looking forward to speaking with attendees later this summer in the three separate Campus Safety events across North America, where we will be able to dive into all these platforms and talk about much more around the lives of our kids’ digital and social media presence.

Original Article

Digital Footprint’s Role in Risk Assessment for Violence Prevention

Enjoy this webinar featuring Safer Schools Together President Theresa Campbell, joined by Senior Vice President at Raptor Technologies Eileen Shihadeh as they discuss Digital Footprints and their role in risk assessment for violence prevention.

Digital Footprint’s Role in Risk Assessment for Violence Prevention

Watch as Eileen Shihadeh of Raptor Technologies and our own Theresa Campbell show how to use tools to establish a digital footprint, and how that can aid in risk assessment.

NBC News – Feature on PSSTWorld Anonymous Reporting Tool

http://www.ksdk.com/article/news/local/online-resource-allows-kids-to-report-safety-concerns-anonymously-to-school/63-519528824

February 16th, 2018
St. Louis County, MO

Online resource allows kids to report safety concerns anonymously to school

After the deadly shooting at a Florida high school, one school district in the St. Louis area is reminding parents that their kids can use an online tool to report anything suspicious, and they can do it anonymously.

“People are rattled by it, so we check on each other and look out for each other and make sure everybody’s doing OK,” Kevin Hampton with the Ferguson-Florissant school district said.

One of the ways the Ferguson-Florissant district does that is through an online resource called PSST World, and they’re the only district in the state that uses it.

Students can click the link on the district’s website, which leads them to a series of questions.

There, they can select their school, the type of problem they’re dealing with, and they can write what’s bothering them.

That information is sent immediately to the district’s safety team.

PSST World is designed by a Canada-based group called Safer Schools Together.

“It gives them the mechanism to get that information to the right people, and it allows an intervention to happen immediately,” Sam Jingfors with Safer Schools Together said.

The group says about 20 districts in North America use the program, and the tips they’ve received help make schools safer.

“Whether it be a gun found on school campus to a fight that happened during lunchtime,” Jingfors said.

“Students are willing to stand up for what is right and wrong,” Hampton said, and the tool just gives them one more way to do that.

“Hopefully in an uncertain world, they know we’re doing what we can do make things safer,” he said.

This is the second school year the Ferguson-Florissant district has used the program.

Global News – New Brunswick School District Implements PSSTWorld

Anglophone West School district launches online reporting tool to combat bullying

Global News – February 14th, 2018

Anglophone West School district launches online reporting tool to combat bullying

Students in Anglophone West School District have a new way to remain safe at school as an online, anonymous reporting tool has been launched.

PSSTWorld is an initiative that’s been growing over the past few years.

Hundreds of schools across Canada have adopted the tool, providing access to over 145,000 students.

“It allows them to be able to report anything that they find to be concerning to them and get that into the hands of the people that need to know about it,” explained Sam Jingfors, director of services for Safer Schools Together.

Students can log onto the PSSTWorld website and through drop-down menus report their issue to the proper channel, all the while remaining anonymous and eliminating the stress students might face by speaking up.

“It could be bullying, cyberbullying, harassment, threats,” explained Judy Cole, communications director for the district. “Any type of safety concern can be reported.”

Anglophone West is the first school district in New Brunswick to use it.

Cole indicated the district’s schools are known to be safe, welcoming places but in the interest of being proactive, they wanted to bring in this new measure.

“We’ve been working on policy development, staff training and student awareness around safety,” Cole said. “The launch of PSSTWorld is the next step in that process.”

PSSTWorld is only monitored during normal school hours, so students in emergency situations are still encouraged to call police directly for immediate assistance.

“Kids and Parents Learn How to Stay Safe Online” – CKPG News Prince George

November 21st, 2017 CKPG News Prince George

The youngest generation has grown up with the internet at their fingertips. That’s why students from grades two to 12 learned about their digital footprint and how to stay safe online this afternoon. A speaker from Safer Schools Together gave a presentation called Social Media Awareness, Digital Footprints, and Cyberbullying. The keyword was online citizenship, it teaches kids to be accountable for their actions and to treat the online world the same as their life offline. “The focus with the students is really on citizenship, how they interact, what does it mean to have a digital profile, what should they be thinking about when they’re online, and how to make a difference,” said speaker, Greg Gerber.

There will also be a seminar for parents tonight at Heather Park. The focus will be on how to monitor a child’s internet use, as well as coaching them to make good choices online. “It’s to keep the message and the language consistent so the parents have the tools to keep their kids safe all the time,” said Heather Park principal, Parrish Child.

Source and Credit: http://ckpgtoday.ca/article/508781/kids-and-parents-learn-how-stay-safe-online

Participants speak out at ERASE Training Sessions

Meet lead trainer Theresa Campbell and others as they discuss recent ERASE Bullying Training Sessions held throughout British Columbia. How to best deal with bullying – and reduce its impact – on children and young people was the focus of an ERASE Bullying Summit hosted by Premier Christy Clark at the Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue in Vancouver. Participants included a broad range of people, from students, parents and educators, to police, community representatives and experts on bullying and student safety.

Learn more: Culture Change Needed to Erase Bullying

Visit the website: ERASE Bullying

See the reporting tool: Report Bullying BC

Theresa Campbell at ERASE Bullying Summit

Meet Theresa Campbell who attended the ERASE Bullying Summit. How to best deal with bullying – and reduce its impact – on children and young people was the focus of the Summit hosted by Premier Christy Clark at the Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue in Vancouver, British Columbia. Participants included a broad range of people, from students, parents and educators, to police, community representatives and experts on bullying and student safety.

Learn more: Culture Change Needed to Erase Bullying

Visit the website: ERASE Bullying

See the reporting tool: Report Bullying BC

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